The Voyage of Bran, Son of Febal. Celts

pages: [1] 2 3 

Similar pages:

  • voyage of bran son of febal
  • "the voyage of bran"

  • How to Link to This Page

    To link to this page from your website, simply cut and paste the following code to your web page.

    It will appear on your page as:

    Celts The Voyage of Bran, Son of Febal from www.lost-civilizations.net








    Search

    This is the beginning of the story. One day, in the neighbourhood of his stronghold, Bran went about alone, when he heard music behind him. As often as he looked back, 'twas still behind him the music was. At last he fell asleep at the music, such was its sweetness. When he awoke from his sleep, he saw close by him a branch of silver with white blossoms, nor was it easy to distinguish its bloom from that branch. Then Bran took the branch in his hand to his royal house. When the hosts were in the royal house, they saw a woman in strange raiment on the floor of the house. 'Twas then she sang the fifty quatrains to Bran, while the host heard her, and all beheld the woman. And she said:

    'A branch of the apple-tree from Emain
    I bring, like those one knows;
    Twigs of white silver are on it,
    Crystal brows with blossoms.

    ' There is a distant isle,
    Around which sea-horses glisten:
    A fair course against the white-swelling surge,
    Four feet uphold it.

    'A delight of the eyes, a glorious range,
    Is the plain on which the hosts hold games:
    Coracle contends against chariot
    In southern Mag Findargat.

    'Feet of white bronze under it
    Glittering through beautiful ages.
    Lovely land throughout the world's age,
    On which the many blossoms drop.


    'An ancient tree there is with blossoms,
    On which birds call to the Hours.
    'Tis in harmony it is their wont
    To call together every Hour.

    'Splendours of every colour glisten
    Throughout the gentle-voiced plains.
    Joy is known, ranked around music,
    In southern Mag Argatné


    'Unknown is wailing or treachery
    In the familiar cultivated land,
    There is nothing rough or harsh,
    But sweet music striking on the ear.

    'Without grief, without sorrow, without death,
    Without any sickness, without debility,
    That is the sign of Emain -
    Uncommon is an equal marvel.


    'A beauty of a wondrous land,
    Whose aspects are lovely,
    Whose view is a fair country,
    Incomparable is its haze.

    'Then if Aircthech is seen,
    On which dragonstones and crystals drop
    The sea washes the wave against the land,
    Hair of crystal drops from its mane.

    'Wealth, treasures of every hue,
    Are in Ciuin, a beauty of freshness,
    Listening to sweet music,
    Drinking the best of wine.

    'Golden chariots in Mag Réin,
    Rising with the tide to the sun,
    Chariots of silver in Mag Mon,
    And of bronze without blemish.


    'Yellow golden steeds are on the sward there,
    Other steeds with crimson hue,
    Others with wool upon their backs
    Of the hue of heaven all-blue.

    'At sunrise there will come
    A fair man illumining level lands;
    He rides upon the fair sea-washed plain,
    He stirs the ocean till it is blood.

    'A host will come across the clear sea,
    To the land they show their rowing;
    Then they row to the conspicuous stone,
    From which arise a hundred strains.

    'It sings a strain unto the host
    Through long ages, it is not sad,
    lts music swells with choruses of hundreds-
    They look for neither decay nor death.


    'Many-shaped Emne by the sea,
    Whether it be near, whether it be far,
    In which are many thousands of motley women,
    Which the clear sea encircles.

    'If he has heard the voice of the music,
    The chorus of the little birds from Imchiuin,
    A small band of women will come from a height
    To the plain of sport in which he is.


    'There will come happiness with health
    To the land against which laughter peals,
    Into Imchiuin at every season
    Will come everlasting joy.

    'It is a day of lasting weather
    That showers silver on the lands,
    A pure-white cliff on the range of the sea,
    Which from the sun receives its heat.


    'The host race along Mag Mon,
    A beautiful game, not feeble,
    In the variegated land over a mass of beauty
    They look for neither decay nor death.

    'Listening to music at night,
    And going into Ildathach,
    A variegated land, splendour on a diadem of beauty,
    Whence the white cloud glistens.

    'There are thrice fifty distant isles
    In the ocean to the west of us;
    Larger than Erin twice
    Is each of them, or thrice.

    'A great birth will come after ages,
    That will not be in a lofty place,
    The son of a woman whose mate will not be known,
    He will seize the rule of the many thousands.


    'A rule without beginning, without end,
    He has created the world so that it is perfect,
    Whose are earth and sea,
    Woe to him that shall be under His unwill!

    'Tis He that made the heavens,
    Happy he that has a white heart,
    He will purify hosts under pure water,
    'Tis He that will heal your sicknesses.


    'Not to all of you is my speech,
    Though its great marvel has been made known:
    Let Bran hear from the crowd of the world
    What of wisdom has been told to him.

    'Do not fall on a bed of sloth,
    Let not thy intoxication overcome thee,
    Begin a voyage across the clear sea,
    If perchance thou mayst reach the land of women.


    Thereupon the woman went from them, while they knew not whither she went.





    page 1 ) next page
    or
    return to Ancient civilizations



    Comments:
    Write new one



    BattleStations, 10/09:
    Hiphop night, at Voodoo Lounge, Plymouth, UK. Every 2nd thursday of the month. 2 entry, Free cake, Bran's on the guest list.
    QUICK LINKS:

    Maya:
    Mayan history

    Celts:
    Druids
    Barbarians
    Celtic Calendar
    Wicca - Paganism
    The Voyage of Bran, Son of Febal

    Inca:
    Inca Civilization
    Tiahuanaco and the Deluge